Recent comments by Cinco-X

Rob Dawg wrote:

Bless your heart.

You've been quite patient and calm...

Outsider wrote:

That is not true. They're on most any super food list.
Beets

Yup...pretty awesome food.

JP wrote:

Outsider wrote:

Said it before, but voting with one's feet makes for a very mobile society.

Vote with one's feet to work for someone who's too stupid to recognize that workers are now paying less, so there's room to reduce the payroll? Yeah, those guys will last long in the competitive marketplace.

She meant downwardly mobile...

Rob Dawg wrote:

Vegetarian Kale Soup Recipe - Allrecipes.com

I'd substitute baby red potatoes and toss in twice as much kale but only at the end of cooking.

My wife cooked a version last night with hot Italian sausage in it. It looked and smelled good, but I can't touch it given the way my stomach has been this year.

Outsider wrote:

This was the first summer I ever grew or ate kale. And I'm addicted. It's super healthy and substitutes for spinach which is more difficult to grow. You "throw it in" things, to kind of mask it over.

My wife and daughter love kale soup.
Vegetarian Kale Soup Recipe - Allrecipes.com

sm_landlord wrote:

So that's what they do with Kale. I know that very few humans must eat it, unless they can't taste it.

It's terrific Winter forage for cattle and other ruminants. Grows right into December here in Zone 5.

lawyerliz wrote:

I personally have not been stimulated.

TMI

Mark Hanson 1 wrote:

Perhaps if they double all the stimulus and debt they have done over the past 6-years over the next 3 to 6 years they can get 2% to 3% CPI on the board.

Spoken like a true Keynesian.
Wink

sporkfed wrote:

Do gas prices really reflect normal supply and demand or do
they reflect a concerted effort to drive down oil prices to break
Russia's economy ?

I've argued that it's the latter. EECON says that's just a side benefit.

BarleyReturns wrote:

Some things sound a bit different like "Scallops coated in Shortbread crumbs and fried w/ bacon"

Can you get that battered and deep fried?

josap wrote:

Ummm. last I heard sex was a great form of exercise.

Sure...if you're on top...

If we want to dig deep, we can trace the origins of the SEC Network all the way back to 1926. That was the year Alabama – four years after their first big victory, over Penn in 1922 – defeated Washington 20-19 in the Rose Bowl. It was a victory that occurred at an especially opportune time, the very moment the South was struggling to come to terms with its self-image in the wake of the Scopes Monkey Trial. (Ku Klux Klan membership reached an all-time high around that same time.) There was, wrote author Don Yaeger in his book Turning of the Tide, a prevailing notion in most of the country that Southerners were "fiercely resistant to change and progress, as many of the northern and western presses depicted the Dixieland Bible Belters as stubborn, backward-thinking simpletons."

Read more: Southern Strategy: The SEC and College Football's Red-State Roots | Rolling Stone

Kinda like HCN now...

ResistanceIsFeudal wrote:

Those aren't levers! You must have been raised in the big city.

Shssssh! I'm trying to trick one of them into milking a bull.

Rob Dawg wrote:

If we hadn't rejected TARP who knows... TARP II? More purchases? Exploding Fed balance sheet? If we had done that we might be even deeper in debt, looking at no recovery and poor employment extended. Our brave and correct choice to go Iceland has proven correct by the rapid recovery, full employment and stable growing economy with pre-recession deficits.

Keynesians don't do sarcasm...

ResistanceIsFeudal wrote:

throws Dawg a handful of unsalted organic kale chips

That's the food my food eats...

poicv2.0 wrote:

When the faith wanes, there's always the Libertarian Sword of Justice™

If you shake it more than twice, you're playing with it...

poicv2.0 wrote:

Why don't they just make it clearer by saying "Lever Up Bitchez!" ?

Leverage often works better in an inflationary environment.

josap wrote:

Main Street lost. It's over. Adapt.

Yup...they won, but it's never over.

Whatever Happened to Overtime? - Nick Hanauer - POLITICO Magazine

...further up the wage scale there’s IBM. Once an icon of innovation for its proud legacy of investing in basic research, the 21st-century IBM has instead chosen to spend an astounding $117.5 billion on stock buybacks since 2003—a remarkable 89.4 percent of total profits.

...if this sounds a little bit like a Ponzi scheme, that’s because it is. I buy my shares back from investors and speculators, who then use that money to buy more shares. We get richer riding this merry-go-round, but the money never touches the real economy. Perhaps you’ve wondered how the stock market hit 17,000 while, at the same time, five years after the end of the Great Recession, the real economy that you live in still kind of sucks? Stock buybacks.

Bad Dawg Bobby wrote:

burnside wrote:

Is there an HCN comment generator?

Ya, we call him Burnside

Belmont and KP are the SPAMbots...

Mike_PNW wrote:

If I import a good for $200..and sell it for $600...it seems like that should generate -$200 GDP by definition..since nothing was produced domestically...I think that's essentially what Apple does (though they obviously have alot of input on the up front design/construction of the phone)..

If I build a product here and export it for $600, I'd think that should add $600 to GDP, assuming all materials and labor came from here as well.

Former Idealist wrote:

It's a joke....most Americans know this.

I think that a greater percentage of people here know this than the 'Merican public at large.

Kaczynski’s methods were crazy, but his loss of faith in the technological frontier is all around us. Consider the trivial but revealing hallmarks of urban hipsterdom: faux vintage photography, the handlebar mustache, and vinyl record players all hark back to an earlier time when people were still optimistic about the future. If everything worth doing has already been done, you may as well feign an allergy to achievement and become a barista.

josap wrote:

Rob Dawg wrote:

We have a three room dome/annex tent

Those are great. We used to have one for a guest tent. Problem is you can't stand up in them. Try putting on a Court Gown with a hoop skirt in a dome.

I'm sure you're thinking of a different poster. (Edit: or maybe not!)

Antipodes wrote:

You need space when you set up camp for a week and the weather turns to custard.

Two Man Tent Fever

Of all such fevers, by far the most deadly is two-man-tent fever, which, in its severity, surpasses even the cabin variety.

I had the opportunity of studying two-man-tent fever close-up a few years ago, when Parker Whitney and I spent nearly 20 hours in his tiny tent waiting for a storm to blow over. Parker is a calm, quiet chap normally and it was terrible to see him go to pieces the way he did, after the fever overtook him.

For a while, during the first few hours of the storm, we were entertained by the prospect that we might momentarily be using the tent as a hang glider. After the wind died down to a modest gale, we were able to devote our whole attention to the rippling of the orange rip-stop nylon that enveloped us. Fascinating as this was, its power to distract was limited to a few hours.then, I was formulating a geological theory that a major earth fault lay directly beneath, and crossed at right angles to, my half-inch thick ensolite pad. While several of my more adventuresome vertebrae were testing this theory, I gradually became aware that Parker was beginning to exhibit certain signs of neurotic behavior.

“I hate to ask this, old chap,” I said, kindly enough, “but would you mind not chewing that gum quite so loud?”

Parker replied with uncharacteristic snappishness, “For the 14th time, I’m not chewing gum!”

Mild hallucination is one of the early symptoms of two-man-tent fever. Not only did Parker fail to realize that he was chomping and popping his gum in a hideous manner, he clearly was of the impression that I had mentioned the matter to him numerous times previously. Since hallucinations do not yield readily to logical argument, I thought that confronting him with the empirical evidence might work. Unfortunately, Parker was now in the grip of paranoia and responded to my effort by shouting out that I had “gone mad.” I suppose he was referring to the manner in which I had grabbed him by the nose and chin and forced his mouth open, a maneuver that proved ineffective, since he had somehow managed to hide the gum from my vision and probing thumb, possibly by lodging it behind his tonsils. Such deception, I might add, is not at all unusual among victims of two-man-tent fever.

Parker remained quiet for some time, although I could tell from the look in his eyes that the paranoia was tightening its hold on him, and I began to wonder if my life might not be in danger. I warned him not to try anything.

“Why don’t you get some sleep?” Parker replied. “Just try to get some sleep!”

“Ha” I said, not without a trace of sarcasm. “Do you really think I’m going to fall for that old one?”

I twisted around in my bag and propped up on an elbow so I could watch Parker more closely. It was easy to see that the two-man-tent fever was taking its toll on him. He was pale and trembling, and stared back at me with wide, unblinking eyes. He looked pitiful, even though posing no less a threat to my life.

Then, as if our situation were not perilous enough already, I noticed that Parker had dandruff. Under normal circumstances, I can take dandruff or leave it alone, but not in a two-man-tent. It wasn’t the unsightly appearance of the dandruff that bothered me, but the little plip plip plip sounds it made falling on his sleeping bag. I soon deduced that Parker had contrived this irritation for the sole purpose of annoying me...

poicv2.0 wrote:

We are off to Thailand in three weeks. Boy oh boy am I looking forward to the food there!

We'll get to hear all about your latest bout of colitis when you get back.

josap wrote:

That is cool!!!!!
We will get a regular fly if they make one for the tents. Some of the pics I saw, there was a rain fly. But it says the tent doesn't need one.

For the life of me I cannot imagine camping in AZ in a tent without a fly. In some areas of that state, they essentially put fly's over trailers to keep the heat down.

josap wrote:

Kodiak Canvas Grand Cabin Tent 12 Person 8 x 26 (Deluxe) | Family Tent Camping

Can you get a fly for it?

lawyerliz wrote:

I dont like marsjmellows amd never have...

Hitting the Percoset early?

lawyerliz wrote:

he has to jang a drape.

:familyblog!:

josap wrote:

Maybe I can talk Hubby to walking over to Dunkin with me.

Why not take the mobility scooter?

poicv2.0 wrote:

//pulls out Dueling Banjos thread music to go with Dueling HCN Idealogies.

I always pegged you for a closet homophilist...

Comrade Janošik wrote:

We need Artisanal Factory Farms!

What you REALLY want is Artisanal Factory Reeducation Farms!
Wink

sporkfed wrote:

No paper plates ?

...and no plastic sporks?

josap wrote:

I love camping.

Great to get away from all that housework drudgery...

sporkfed wrote:

Cinco, I'm pulling for Auburn over Bama. Spread the pain around.

I know...and the nation would love an SEC free inaugural CFP

NSFW: It's Meltdown Time! Week Twelve - Roll 'Bama Roll

For sporkfed if he shows...he'll enjoy the Auburn Meltdown...

Pigged josap wrote:

Don't know. I get sick to my stomach, some cramping all the way through until I get rid of it.
Used to throw it up as a kid, if I had milk. I don't drink milk but will have ice cream sometimes.

Try taking Lactaid with any milk product. I even take it with Lactose free milk products sometimes...

sporkfed wrote:

GE wouldn't be in favor of more government spending because they benefit from it, would they ?

Naaahhhhhhhhhhhh!

prairiedog wrote:

Anybody here remember when doctors did house calls?

Yes...of course, I wouldn't necessarily want to go back to those days. Most cancers then were a death sentence, and the average lifespan was about 65...

josap wrote:

Now I have hit max out of pocket due to the hospital stay. Can't say if it was smart or dumb.

It's typical for insurance. If you win, you lose, and if you lose, you win...